Another test, or why my hip hurts

Nikki and I as I was about to be wheeled down to the procedure.

This week, as if dodging Hurricane Irma wasn’t exciting enough, I also had to travel to Atlanta for a new bone marrow biopsy. This was my third. First one indicated possible MDS in November 2015, but it was such a long shot they kept looking for a cause elsewhere. I had another one in January 2016 that led to my eventual diagnosis. This one was for a more exciting prospect. This bone marrow biopsy was one of the early steps in moving forward with a transplant. There is still a long way to go, but there is progress. And, progress is exciting.

Since I had to be at the hospital at 7 AM, we went up the evening before. Had dinner at The Cowfish, which despite the mind boggling fusion of sushi and burgers, was delicious. We got up, headed to the hospital the next morning, and had a flat tire.

A flat tire. Seriously? The good news is I drove around the hotel instead of pulling straight out into traffic. As annoying as it was, we were able to deal with it in the hotel parking lot instead of on the side of the road. And y’all, I have a superhero wife too. She was out there right with me working to get it changed, and doing it quickly enough that we were only 15 minutes late for my appointment.

The biopsy went well. I was sedated, so it was much better than the second one. The only complaint I have is they didn’t use my port, which means I had to get an IV, in the hand no less. But, that is just a personal annoyance.

We’ll get the results in a few weeks, and then we will know more about moving forward with the transplant. Until then, I’m still going with the chemo, Survive and Thrive “therapy”, biweekly blood tests, and blood transfusions when I need them.

The Facts About Hurricanes

Flooding following Hurricane Harvey.

I’ve been seeing many posts on social media lately saying Hurricane Irma will be the first Category 6 storm. They point to seemingly legitimate “news” articles to back the claim. So, to debunk them, here are some actual facts.

There is no need for a category 6 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The scale, developed in 1971 by Robert Simpson and Herbert Saffir, categorizes storm strength as it relates to wind speed. There are five (and only five) categories. When asked why there were not more, and if any should be added, Dr. Simpson (no relation, by the way) responded, “…[W]hen you get up into winds in excess of 155 miles per hour you have enough… damages that are serious… So I think that it’s immaterial what will happen with winds stronger than 156 miles per hour. That’s the reason why we didn’t try to go any higher than that anyway.” (Mariners Weather Log, April 1999, pp. 10-12)

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Category

Sustained Winds

Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds

1 74-95 mph
64-82 kt
119-153 km/h
Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.
2 96-110 mph
83-95 kt
154-177 km/h
Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.
3
(major)
111-129 mph
96-112 kt
178-208 km/h
Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
4
(major)
130-156 mph
113-136 kt
209-251 km/h
Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
5
(major)
157 mph or higher
137 kt or higher
252 km/h or higher
Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

 

The National Hurricane Center also has a graphic to demonstrate the anticipated damages from the different wind speeds.

The SSHWS applies to any cyclone with 74 MPH or greater winds

Category 5 has no upper limit. Since the scale was developed to describe anticipated damages from different wind speeds, Category 5 means near total destruction. Beyond that point, it doesn’t matter if it’s 155 MPH or 190 MPH as was the case with Hurricane Allen in 1980.

Wind isn’t the only damaging force

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image of Hurricane Sandy off the southeastern United States.

Remember Hurricane Sandy? It was only a Category 3. Yet it still caused $75 billion in damages. Tropical Storm Allison (2001) did $9 billion in damage, and was never a hurricane. Conversely, Category 5 Hurricane Emily (2005) did slightly over $1 billion in damage. While Hurricane Katrina, the modern standard by which cyclones are measured, cost 1,836 lives as a Category 5, the Category 2 Hurricane Fifi-Orlene in 1974 cost 8,000 lives.

Typically, more damage is caused by flooding, both by direct rain and storm surge. That was the case with Harvey. That was the case with Katrina.

There are scientific reports, journalism reports, and click bait reports

It is very easy now to make a webpage look like it came from a legitimate news site. Sadly, there are people who use fear tactics to drive internet traffic and get more views for the ads on their page. There are many legitimate news organizations that portray the facts as more precarious than they are to increase viewership. There are also plenty of organizations, especially in my local market, which do an AMAZING job of presenting the facts. But, like with most things, if you want the best information, go directly to the source.

The National Hurricane Center has remarkable resources anytime there are active storms. They also post regular updates to their Facebook Page. For live observation reports, the Hurricane Watch Net provides great resources as well as streaming audio when the net is active.

Be alert, but don’t panic

Pay attention to the directions of emergency management officials. They may paint a grim picture, but their number one job is to keep everyone alive. Things can be replaced. People cannot. If you are ordered to evacuate, evacuate. If the evacuation doesn’t apply to your area, be prepared to shelter in place for a while. Have a Ready Kit. Have a Family Emergency Plan. Be prepared and stay alive.

———-

Daniel R. Simpson is an amateur radio operator in central Georgia. He is the Emergency Coordinator for Baldwin County ARES as well as a Public Information Officer and Local Government Liaison for the ARRL Field Organization. He has completed numerous trainings from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Weather Service, and American Radio Relay League. 

Thoughts on Charlottesville

It has taken me a while to write this. My heart hurts with what has happened, and it is difficult for me to find words. However, I know I cannot be silent.

I am a Christian. I am male. I am southern. I am descended from ancestors who were primarily Anglican and Celtic. I am proud to be each of these, and I should be. They are who I am. They are what made me.

But, I am also angry. No, I am outraged. How DARE these perversions of everything I hold dear openly proclaim the direct antithesis of these values while claiming to operate under their banner?

My faith tells me God created all things, and all of humankind is in his likeness. We are all descended from one man and one woman. Scripture never mentions race. It talks about tribes and nations, but those are political and cultural differences.

More than being a man, I strive to be a gentleman. This means I treat everyone with civility and respect regardless of background, social standing, and or potential benefit to me. Even more than that, I am a southern gentleman. I say y’all, sir, and ma’am. I can brew the best sweet tea you have ever tasted and put away fried chicken with the best of them.

As I research my ancestors, I find men who fought with honor. Unfortunately, through the lens of history we see that their causes all had blemishes. Slavery during the Civil War is at the forefront, but the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, treatment of the Native-Americans during the westward expansion, and the allowance of slavery in the first place are all dark blemishes on our collective past. But, as painful as reminders of these can be, it is important to keep them at the forefront of our memory.

The memory of this nation is short. We need the reminders. We need to be shocked. We need to experience the pain of what we have done. Only through that will be always be on our guard to never let it happen again.

We cannot rewrite history. We must celebrate the accomplishments of the past while recognizing the failures of the same men we herald. There is no historical figure who was perfect, and neither are we. It is up to us to do the very best we can to strive towards the ideal of liberty and equality espoused in our founding documents. We will never be perfect, but we can be better. We must be better. We will be better.

That being said, there is no place in the political conversation for those who wish to eliminate or segregate all those who disagree with them. The foundation of our political system is discourse, not violence. Until we return to civility with each other, the nature of our republic itself is in jeopardy.

Violence has no place in the discussion, from either side. If you feel the need to resort to violence, you should re-evaluate your argument. White supremacists who defend your arguments with scripture, try reading it for yourself for a change. Don’t call yourself Christian until you start behaving like a follower of Christ. Don’t claim your racism represents southern heritage until you embrace how many aspects of southern culture came from Africa.

We are one nation. This nation was built on the idea that ALL men (and women) are created equal. They share the same rights, responsibilities, and struggles. We are all in it together. Let’s act like it.

The Importance of Training for Emergency Communications

Last weekend, I had the opportunity to present to the Milledgeville Amateur Radio Club (full disclosure, I’m also their vice president) about why we should always be training and learning, especially when it comes to emergency and public service communications.

I have the video, slides, and handout posted on my site for your viewing. Please feel free to send me any feedback!

View Presentation Page

Want information about amateur radio for your school, community, or civic group? Contact me at k4drs@arrl.net.

Collegiate Recruiting: Finding the Next Generation

I had submitted this to QST for review, but apparently SueAnne Griffith’s piece (August 2017) was already in the pipeline ahead of mine. Granted, that assumption also requires that my submission was worthy of publication, but… I’m going to embrace the hubris that it was. 🙂

So, to keep it from going to waste, I am posting it here for your consideration.


Collegiate Recruiting:
Finding the Next Generation

Through the years, I have been involved with many aspects of student organizations, both as member, officer, and now advisor looking to revitalize the club at my alma mater.  Because of this, I have experienced many different styles of recruiting with varying levels of effectiveness. Now, I want to share my experiences in hopes of aiding the growth of other clubs as well.

Becoming known

Every campus has a special place where students gather. For my campus (Go Bobcats!), it was by “the fountain.” For others it may be the quad, student center, or tailgates. But the simple fact is, most institutions will not be willing to allocate a permanent space, and definitely not funding, to a group with only a few members. So recruitment must become a priority.

The Collegiate Amateur Radio Forum at Orlando Hamcation provided some great ideas, but more can be done. Here are some tried and true methods that have been proven effective time and again.

Effective Tabeling

Information tables are a college tradition, but most fall short of perfection. There are elements that will make your effort standout from the crowd. First, it needs to be catchy. Have a well designed banner so people know who you are – they can readily be found online for less than $50.  Have plenty of brochures and handouts as a takeaway item. Many are available from the ARRL, but it is also quite easy to adopt them to your campus.

Approach your local radio club for start-up assistance. See if they can provide go-kits for a demonstration on the table. A portable antenna will certainly be an eyecatcher among other groups who are tabling as well. They may even be willing to provide some funding for handouts and giveaways, which leads to the number one method of getting a college student’s attention: freebies!

Students love free food. It could be pizza, candy, or bags of chips or crackers. The one caveat to this, especially if you are in the south, is to avoid chocolate. It can quickly make a mess if left in sunlight or high temperatures. You can also consider koozies, frisbees, or flash drives (pre-loaded with some club fliers and information, of course).

Have volunteers rotate between talking on the radio and talking to passers by. Some should be in front of the table so it appears friendly and engaging. Be prepared to talk to students in all of the programs offered by the institution, not just STEM. Criminal justice and government majors will likely be attracted to the emergency communication and public service aspects. Journalism, marketing, and communication students will likely be interested in how it ties into the technology used for broadcasting. And yes, STEM students will be interested in the technology and maker aspects.

Keep in mind diversity at your table. Volunteers from your local club are great, but they are just a start. Do your best to also have college age volunteers. Get the YLs involved. If someone’s grandchild is popular in Greek Life or athletics, offer him a lunch to spend an hour with you.

Follow-Up

Outreach is only the first step. You can have a table with dozens of people surrounding it the entire time period, and it still be a failure. Don’t just give out cards, have people sign-up for an email list. You could even include a drawing for a gift card to a local restaurant or the campus bookstore. Then use that information.

Send out an email to everyone who stopped by thanking them for their time and inviting them to follow your club on social media.  Let them know about upcoming events and talks, or license classes. Remember, just because they may not be interested in getting licensed right now, they still may show up for discussions specific to their interest.

Conclusion

Overall, remember to make it fun. College students have enough serious topics to face on a day to day basis. Set up the demonstrations like a mini-Field Day or special event. This is the generation of the smartphone, so instant communication will not impress them. Show them how amateur radio is different, fun, and experiential. It truly is a hobby with something for everyone. It’s just a matter of helping students find something that sparks their interest.

—————–

Daniel R. Simpson, K4DRS was first licensed at 11 years old and was active in amateur radio and other student groups in college and graduate school. He can be reached at P.O. Box 1882, Milledgeville, Georgia 31059 or at k4drs@arrl.net.