Learning to be Prepared

“In moments of crisis, the initiative passes to those who are the best prepared.”
~ Morton C. Blackwell ~

That quote is one which is firmly engrained in my memory. As number forty-one in Blackwell’s Laws of the Public Policy Process, it is not only great advice for those working in politics, but also for everyday life. I know I have shared it repeatedly with my advisees over the past few weeks. I even have a framed copy propped on the windowsill in my office.

In everything, preparation is the key. In your classes, your grades will be substantially better if you actually studied before the exam. Your grades will likewise improve if you studied over the course of the preceding week instead of holding out for a last minute all-nighter in the library.

Preparation is planning. It is being informed. Every college student should have a notebook with a list of classes required to graduate, a list of classes they have already taken, and a list of classes which are still required. As the time for registration draws near, compare the list of needed classes to the classes being offered. You should already know what classes are needed well before registration opens – and for that matter, before you meet with your advisor.

You are in control of your education. You are no longer in high school. While advisors (or advisers?) and professors are here to help you, you must be proactive. We can point you in the right direction, but you must also do your part as well. The goal of college is not to get you – the student – to be able to repeat information on a test. The point of college is not even to get good grades.

Instead, the entire point of college is actually two-fold. First, we should teach you – not what to think – but HOW to think. Over your course of study, you should learn how to process information and make decisions from it; knowledge is much more than being able to recite the information presented in a lecture. Secondly, we are to teach you the skills necessary to be successful in your career. If you miss a deadline in college, it might affect your grade. If you miss a deadline in the professional world, it could very well cost your job. I would much rather teach my students and advisees the value of a preparation and organization now, rather than them having to learn it from an employer later.

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