We few, we happy few – Part I

“We few, we happy few, we band of brothers.” Some readers may recognize this line from Shakespeare’s Henry V. But to me, it has a more special meaning. This is one of the passages, along with many others, my friends and I used to quote to each other for motivations before big exams, or on particularly late nights in The Bunker writing. We were by no means the type to sit around singing sonnets, but there is something that is powerfully motivating about epic poetry. There is something even more motivating about the reassurance than you are not alone in your work.

Turabian (2007, 22-23) talks about the isolation of research and the need for a writing support group. This is a brilliant idea. The guide points out that, even with different research interests, these peer groups can help with brainstorming, proofreading, and even letting off steam. But, they can be a lot more than that.

I was very lucky. With me going for my MPA in the same department where I had just received my undergrad, I was not alone. There were a group of us that had known each other as undergrads that all started the program together and had basically the same classes. Though the program doesn’t have a formal program, I call this group my cohort. We were all graduate assistants, two of us in the same department. Since we had an office (the aforementioned Bunker), we were the gathering place.

Let me point out, these groups are not to do each others work. That defeats the entire point of education. Instead, it was for the purpose of mutual aid and support. We would all be sitting in the office, sometimes writing the same assignment for the same class, but we where still four students, with four backgrounds. As such, we always wrote four very different papers. What I mean by aid and support is being able to answer the questions “How do we format this?” or “Y’all did catch that the assignment is continued on the back of that page, right?”

Something that we did do together was summarize our texts. In undergrad, we were able to read the chapter, read the terms, and be fine. Not so at the next level, where a deeper knowledge of the material is required. Something we did, that worked amazingly well, was divide and conqueror the readings. We all still read everything, but we (within our group) assigned different chapters to different members. This means, instead of having to do outlines and terms for the entire book, we’d only have to do the in-depth summaries of 2-3 chapters. We’d then share these outlines with each other, in exchange from the ones from the others. It was a great time-saver to be sure.

There were some other things we did, but that’s for Part II.

References:
Shakespeare, William, The Life of King Henry the Fifth, act 4, scene 3
Turabian, Kate L.. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

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