Govern Yourselves


Note: This is being cross posted for Georgia College freshmen, so it includes links to some GC information. My apologies to those who are at other campuses, though I am sure there are similar programs at most college campuses.

In Webster’s 1828 Dictionary, “Government” was defined first not as an entity, but as the ability to manage yourself. It is to show control or restraint. The example which is given is “Men are apt to neglect the government of their temper and passions.” This “self-government” is one of the big differences when transferring from one level of education to another. When you’re in high school, you are constantly reminded to turn in your assignments. You are given time in study hall to complete you homework. Your schedule is mapped out for you. When you begin college, it is up to you to manage your schedule, manage your time, and manage your academics.

Part of maturity, and part of growing up, is becoming responsible for your own life. Your parents will no longer make sure you are awake on time to go to class. Your professors will not constantly remind you of due dates. If an assignment is on the syllabus, many times that is the only reminder you will receive. With the increased independence of college life, comes increased responsibility.

To adapt to these new responsibilities, you have to have a plan. Create some sort of time management system. It can be your phone or online calendar, or a hard copy calendar. Just keep something so you know where you are supposed to be at what time. Keep a list of all your assignments for the quarter for every class. That way, you will be able to tell at a glance what is due in the next five days.

But, the biggest issue in time management is oftentimes prioritization of certain activities. When you are creating your plan, there are some things that MUST be included (attending class, sleep, eating) but many times, there are vital things which are overlooked. Most people are awake between 16-18 hours a day. Of that, about 3 hours is typically spent in the classroom and (nominally) 6 hours is spent studying. What should be done with the other 7 hours a day?

Well, quite frankly, that is where you get the education you don’t receive in the classroom. You may work a part time job, perform community service projects, be involved in student activities, or just hang out with friends. All of these things are vital to the college experience. You just have to govern how you approach them. My first two years of college, I was in no less six student organizations at any given time, plus worked several part time jobs. While that time period is an impressive block on my resume, I ended up leaving most of them off the document. Why? Because most of them really didn’t mean anything five years down the road (aka, when I graduate and started looking for my first professional job).

It is much better to be involved in one or two groups, perform your duties well, and be promoted through the ranks than it is to be in everything which remotely interests you and become spread too thin. Plus, excelling in a few things which demonstrate leadership ability will prove invaluable in your future job search.

To wrap things up, as you are planning and following your schedule, focus on academics. But, remember to include personal time and time for extracurricular activities. They are all important and none should be neglected. You just have to find the balance which is right for you.

Link Roundup:
A Crash Course in Student Time Management by Cal Newport
An older post, but it is a collection of links to different time management systems.
One of this week’s posts from Hack College. Provides good information for the start of an academic term (even though we are a few weeks ahead of schedule here at Georgia College).
Focused more towards upperclassmen and grad students, this Grad Hacker post sheds some light on the dreaded Lit Review (which I addressed here and here).

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